Public Procurement

Pre-commercial Procurement of Innovation

Pre-commercial Procurement of Innovation - A missing link in the European Innovation Cycle

This report shows how a first-buyer function can be built up in a European single market that aims at being competitive, fair and transparent. The report introduces the concept of Pre-commercial Procurement of Innovation, to address a generally missing link in the European innovation cycle, the public procurer that is prepared to share benefits and risks with industry in order to exploit the results of research, moving research developments from their early stages to tested pre-commercial products ready for commercialisation. Such first buyers play an important role in the US economy as well as in the major Asian economies. For their product development, many European companies have historically benefited from first-buyer partnerships with state monopolies. Those partnerships are now successively dissolved as the markets, rightly so, are deregulated. The report explains how Pre-commercial Procurement of Innovation can be organised within the WTO rules applying the new public procurement directives and the state aid rules recently under consultation.

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Opportunities for Public Technology Procurement in the ICT-related sectors in Europe

The final report of the study “Opportunities for Public Technology Procurement in the ICT-related sectors in Europe”. The study was carried out by Ramboll Management for the European Commission, Directorate-General for Information Society and Media. The research for this study was carried out between May 2006 and September 2007.

The study “Opportunities for Public Technology Procurement in the ICT-related sectors in Europe” was commissioned by the European Commission, DG Information Society and Media and carried out by Ramboll Management. The overall aim of the study is to explore, through the analysis of case studies, the hypothesis that technology procurement can be an effective but currently underutilised resource for driving technological innovation in Europe in the ICT domain. The term “public technology procurement” can cover both procurements focusing
on the early adoption and diffusion of new-on-the market technology (incremental innovation) as well as procurements focusing on the research and development of totally new technology (radical innovation).

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Driving Innovation to Ensure High Quality Public Services in Europe

Pre-commercial Procurement: Driving innovation to ensure sustainable high quality public services in Europe

The Communication on a "broad based innovation strategy for the EU"1 highlighted the importance of public procurement in reinforcing the innovation capabilities of the Union whilst improving the quality and efficiency of public services. It also underlined the untapped opportunities in Europe for pre-commercial procurement. In its conclusions on the above Communication, Council invited the Commission to provide guidance on how EU rules on public procurement can be used to stimulate innovation. The European Parliament's resolution of June 2007 on the transposition and implementation of public procurement legislation encouraged the wider use of pre-commercial procurement in the EU.

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Public Procurement for the Promotionof R&D and Innovation in ICT

R&D was considered by the Barcelona European Council (March 2002) to be a key instrument for innovation, growth and employment. Acknowledging that the EU is lagging behind the US and Japan on R&D expenditure as a share of GDP, the Council set the target of increasing the average research investment level from 1.97% to 3% of GDP by 2010, of which two thirds should be funded by the private sector.
Furthermore, recognising the significant role that ICT has in stimulating growth and employment, the 2005 “i2010” policy set a number of objectives to stimulate research into ICT.

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Public Procurement for the Promotion of R&D and Innovation in ICT Summary

R&D was considered by the Barcelona European Council (March 2002) to be a key instrument for innovation, growth and employment. Acknowledging that the EU is lagging behind the US and Japan on R&D expenditure as a share of GDP, the Council set the target of increasing the average research investment level from 1.97% to 3% of GDP by 2010, of which two thirds should be funded by the private sector. Furthermore, recognising the significant role that ICT has in stimulating growth and employment, the 2005 ‚Äúi2010‚Äù policy set a number of objectives to stimulate research into ICT.

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